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Robertson Plantation

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THIS IS A STOP ON THE SALADO NATIONAL LANDMARKS TOUR - PLEASE RESPECT THE PROPERTY OF ANY PRIVATE BUSINESS OR RESIDENTS AT THIS LANDMARK.

The plantation of Col. Elijah Sterling Clack Robertson is outstanding among the architectural sites. This complex includes a complete assemblage of outbuildings and a residence which is one of the best examples of the Greek Revival style as it was interpreted in Texas. The buildings remain intact in their original setting, and form one of the best-preserved complexes from the plantation era. The facade of the house is divided into five parts, so that the central and two end bays constitute pavilions dominated by gables and separated by galleries. The house is reminiscent of some examples of American late Georgian architecture, and was likely inspired by a house in Tennessee that was the birthplace of the builder (Webb and Alexander). Squared columns support the two-story porticoes with their balustrades, and the central, double-door entrance has both transom and http://sidelights.Large double-hung windows with six-over-six lights and louvered shutters punctuate the clapboard walls, while dentils accentuate the comice and pediments. In constructing his house. Col. Robertson included a "strangers' room" in one of the end pavilions, to allow newcomers and travelers to lodge at his home without bothering his family. The stone kitchen, originally detached, was joined to the house by an addition made in the 1880s, thus breaking somewhat the symmetry of the plan. Otherwise the house has remained intact through six generations of the Robertson family. Included in the nominated property are the servants' quarters, which is a single-story stone structure of rectangular plan and gabled roof, a stone and wood bam, and the family cemetery in which Col. Robertson is buried.
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